meat chickens – Freedom Ranger update

Meat chickens at 8 weeks

Our Freedom Rangers meat chickens are now 8 weeks old and growing well and we thought we would do an update.  They spent almost two weeks in the brooder and then went out onto grass inside our chicken tractor.  It will be another 4 weeks before this straight run batch of 26 chickens get to butcher weight.

meat chickens
Freedom Rangers meat chickens at 8 weeks

Observations about our Freedom Ranger meat chickens

Without question, these Freedom Ranger meat chickens forage more than the Cornish Cross we have raised in the past.  We have watched as they tear up clover, grass and scratched for insects.  I’ve thrown a few bugs in the tractor and watched as they ate them.

Although they do forage for additional things to eat, I don’t think they take in very much of their daily calories this way.  They still spend the majority of their day at the feeder eating the chick grower.  Considering these chickens are fed for an additional 4 weeks as compared to the Cornish cross, I am not convinced they will require less feed to get to butcher weight.  We are documenting how much feed we use to feed them to butcher weight.

This fall, after the heat of summer has passed, we hope to bring some Cornish cross to butcher weight as a comparison.  We will record how much feed we give them and compare it to our results from the Freedom Rangers.

Freedom ranger meat chickens
Freedom ranger rooster at 8 weeks

Our second batch of Freedom Rangers

At the 6 week mark of our first batch of these Freedom Ranger meat chicks we ordered another 25 chicks from Freedom Ranger Hatchery.  For this order we elected to get all cockerels for the same price as straight run.  We received 27 chicks with our second order and lost a single chick on their second day in the brooder.  The remaining  26 are healthy and growing well.  They will be moved to a second John Suscovich style stress-free chicken tractor next week.

John Suscovich chicken tractor

John Suscovich chicken tractor

Recently we built a modified version of the John Suscovich chicken tractor for our Freedom Ranger meat chickens.  We bought his book, Stress-Free Chicken Tractor Plans, with the plans and built a modified version of it.

A chicken tractor for a tall person

After watching several videos on YouTube I noticed folks having to duck their heads to get in or out of the chicken tractor.  As a tall guy who is forever bashing my forehead into things, I decided I’d build it a little taller.  We went and looked what widths the wire we needed that was available in our area.  After looking in 4 different stores we found it was available in 24 and 36 inch widths.  Ultimately, we decided to built our chicken tractor 1 foot taller.

From the parts list in John’s book, parts A, B, I and K were cut 1 foot longer.  Parts A and B are what give the sides their height.  In the picture below, parts  A are the 2 vertical boards in the middle below the tarp.  Parts B are the two, one on each end.

John Suscovich chicken tractor
John Suscovich chicken tractor

Other slight modifications to the Chicken Tractor

Roosting bar

Because we are raising Freedom Rangers, we decided to add a roosting bar to our John Suscovich chicken tractor.  A 2×4 was used to provide them a place to roost.  You can see it, and one of the two addition pieces of lumber we used in this photo.

John Suscovich chicken tractor
Roosting bar added to our John Suscovich chicken tractor

Closet shelf and rod bracket

In the picture above you can see our yellow bucket automatic waterer hanging from a closet shelf and rod bracket.  We use it, and 18 inch length of chain to suspend our bucket waterer.  It uses the automatic water nipples to provide clean water to our chickens.  You will notice in the picture below that the chain links fit over the rod hook.  Raising the bucket height a link at a time is easy.

John Suscovich chicken tractor
Closet shelf and rod bracket

Adding a door closure

The first week our John Suscovich chicken tractor was in use there was a small incident when the front of the tractor was pointed downhill.  while inside to top off the feeder several chicks escaped out the door that swung open with the aid of gravity.  By adding a simple door closure spring no more chicks escape while we are inside the tractor.

John Suscovich chicken tractor
door closure spring used to keep the door closed while inside our John Suscovich chicken tractor

A long tarp to cut down on the wind

Our first batch of meat chickens were going to be in the tractor while it was still pretty cool and windy at night.  Because of the wind, we elected to get a tarp that would go all the way to the ground on both sides.  During the summer we will roll the sides up to give them plenty of breeze. (See picture at the top of this entry)  We went with a 12 with the extra length used to partially cover the back end of the tractor.