Tag Archives: garden planning detail sheet

Starting spring crops

Starting spring crops

It is February, which means it is time to be starting spring crops.  We start all our seedlings under grow lights and on seedling heat mats.  Everything is in our basement currently, but in the future we will be moving seedling production to the greenhouse.

Our seedling flats were moved to the basement today and have begun to come up to germination temperature.  Once the growing medium reaches the correct temperature we will add seeds.

Starting spring crops

Start with hardy and moderately hardy varieties

Everything we are starting now are varieties that are hardy and moderately hardy.  They will go into the garden well before our average last day of frost and will be protected with mini hoop houses.   Some of this will hopefully be going into a greenhouse we will build soon.

Our seedling choices for spring

We have amended our list of crops for this year.  Those we will be planting first are broccoli, cauliflower, onions, kale, spinach, red and white beets, and cabbage.

Determining when to start seedlings

While planning or starting spring crops we take advantage of the garden planning detail sheet in spreadsheet form.  We enter or ADLF and the spreadsheet will calculate when we need to start and transplant the different seedlings.  You can get the XLS file from the Mittleider Gardening group on Facebook.  It is in the files section there in the group.

Every couple weeks we will be starting more seedlings.

Changes we are making to our garden plan

We are dropping a few plant varieties that we really don’t eat and have added a few.   Radishes, eggplant, bush beans and Brussels sprouts have been removed from our garden plan for this year.  The bush beans were difficult to get everything picked without having some sort of trellis to hold up  the plants.  We are instead going a pole bean.  The others we found we just don’t eat much.  That space they used to occupy will be better used for the things we do eat.

planning your Mittleider garden

Planning your Mittleider garden

Knowing how many seedlings you need  when planning your Mittleider garden can be difficult to figure out. Tools like the Mittleider garden planning detail sheet is invaluable in helping the gardener calculate how many seedlings will be needed.  Certainly a simple calculator would make the process easier as well.

You can find a copy of the garden planning detail sheet inside the Mittleider Gardening Course book.  A digital copy of it is available for free in the files section of the Mittleider Facebook group.  We choose to use the garden planning detail sheet as a spreadsheet to make the process a little easier.

planning your Mittleider garden with the garden planning detail sheet
planning your Mittleider garden

How we use the garden planning detail sheet

First we determine how many feet of soil beds and grow boxes we need to fill.  Once that is done we decide how many feet of each crop we need to plant.  Because we like to use the spreadsheet version of the garden planning details sheet, we started a spreadsheet like the one below.

planning your Mittleider garden
Planning your Mittleider garden

The hardiness, spacing and number of columns comes from the garden planning detail sheet.  The total feet is how much of the bed we want for a specific crop.  It was determined by how much of each particular plant we want to grow based upon our need and the available room in our garden.

The seedling number is determined by multiplying the number of feet times 12 to get the number of inches.  Take that number and divide by the number in the spacing column.  As a reminder, that comes from the garden planning detail sheet.  Take that number and multiply it by the number of rows.  This will tell you the total number of seedlings you will need for the allotted space in your soil bed or grow box.

For the example given above, I will need 32 red beet seedlings to fill 3 feet of our soil bed.  The “+ 10” portion I will discuss next.

Always plant extra seeds

Regardless of where your seeds come from there isn’t going to be a consistent 100 percent germination rate.  Each time seeds are planted for seedlings you will need to plant extra to make up for those which fail to germinate.

Seeds bought from a reputable company will average as much as 85 percent germination rate. What that in mind we can plant an extra 15-20 percent and should have enough seedlings to fill our allotted garden space.

Another tip I might like to point out here, in those seeds that do germinate there will be seedlings that fail to thrive or just look weak.  Those seedlings should never make it into your garden.

To help ensure only our strongest seedlings make it into the garden we plant an extra 10 percent of seeds.  That makes a total of 30 percent extra seeds being planted.  In most cases this will produce adequate enough seedlings to cover failure to germinate and the weak seedlings.

Because of the extra seeds planted we have plenty of healthy seedlings to fill the soil beds in our garden.

Planning your Mittleider garden video

For the gardeners who are visual learners, I’ve made this video and uploaded it to our YouTube channel.