Category Archives: Tools

Kenyon hoe needed sharpening

The mighty Kenyon 2-way hoe

The Kenyon hoe is known by other names.  It is also called a scuffle hoe or possibly even a stirrup hoe.  Regardless of the name it is one of the most used tools in our Mittleider garden.  From time to time the edge gets beat up due to normal use and needs fixed.  It is an easy process and only requires a small file.

The edge of our Kenyon 2-way hoe was getting a little beat up and becoming difficult to pull through this very dry heavy clay soil.  Rather than throw it away or paying someone to repair it we elected to do it ourselves.  A quick dressing took us just a minute or two with a file and as a result we got the edge back in good condition and working better.

Using a file to sharpen a Kenyon hoe
Sharpening a Kenyon gardening hoe with a file

To fix the edge of your Kenyon hoe with a file

It is an easy process and a decent file is inexpensive.  If you don’t have one this flat file is just $6.21 and will do the job.  Keep the file at the same angle as the edge of the hoe.  A few passes will remove any burrs and dress that edge back to serviceable condition as a result of your effort.  During normal use you will hit small rocks and other such debris that will slightly damage the cutting edge.

Stanlet mill file
A good file choice for sharpening a Kenyon hoe

Do you want to put your own Kenyon hoe together?

In this YouTube video I show you how I assembled our Kenyon hoe and gave a quick example of it working in the garden.  These are an amazing tool and should probably  be present in every garden.  The Kenyon hoe allows you to remove the same amount of weeds from your garden with far less work than a traditional hoe.

 

Protecting garden tools with wooden handles using linseed oil

This past week while working towards getting our garden in I’ve noticed the wooden handles on a few garden tools were looking pretty rough.  They’ve lost all the sealant applied by the factory and a few are shwohg signs of weather cracking.  That’s a receipe for having to replace handles.

 We just happened to have a quart of boiled linseed oil to help remedy this issue.  A light sanding to remove the remaining finish and to open the grains so they can absorb the oil and we were in business.  We simply poured a bit of the linseed oil onto a rag and then rubbed it into the handle.  Everything has been treated three times so far but two of the pieces with the worst cracking will get several additional coats before we put everything away. 
There are no pictures to show what the looked like before we started, but the handles were closer to a white than the brown you see now.