Category Archives: Vertical Gardening

Geothermal Greenhouse tomatoes in NW Missouri

Yesterday I visited a geothermal greenhouse to see the progress of the plants inside.   These tomatoes, 5 different varieties if I remember correctly, were planted back in the first week of April.  They’re easily 3 times the size of my own tomatoes that are growing outdoors.

Tomatoes grown vertically using the Mittleider method

Spaghetti squash is growing like mad 

One of our favorite vegetables has become spaghetti squash over the last year.  The children are very picky eaters and I was amazed when I gave them a sample of spaghetti squash and they asked for more.

This year we are going to grow two crops of the spaghetti squash with the second one being in the in the garden green house.  The first crop is out in the soil and many of the plants are already over 8 feet tall.  Here is just one of the many squash growing in our garden.

Growing spaghetti squash vertically in a Mittleider garden

Stringing up the tomatoes to grow vertically

We’ve got half a bed of tomatoes in the garden that needed twine to train them to grow vertically.  The tomatoes are planted 9 inches apart and alternate which direction they will be trained to grow.  Growing them this way ensures they will get adequate light and space when trimmed properly.  

We will also be growing other things vertically in this manner such as cucumbers, squash, pole beans and melons. 

Preparing more space for Mittleider vertical gardening

We are a little short on room for growing all our vertical crops and decided to put in two more of the 30 foot long by 18 inch wide Mittleider grow beds.  These grow beds will run north and south.  To the west side of these two beds there will be a couple more grow beds for additional crops that won’t be grown vertically.  

For grow beds/boxes that run east and west you want to put the tall crops to the north end so they don’t shadow out the shorter crops.  For beds running north and south you’ll want those same tall crops to the east for the same reason.

Below you will see the garden area that’s been tilled and read to get started in the first picture.   There will be a 5 foot wide buffer zone on the outside edge of our Mittleider garden with a 3.5 foot space between each 18″ wide bed.  The portion of the garden to the right that has grass in it will be tilled several times and all that grass will be removed. 

preparing the soil for  a Mittleider grow bed
preparing the soil for a Mittleider grow bed

Here you see the t-posts going in that will form the support for our vertical gardening.  They’re being placed every 10 feet, or 4 of these 4x4s in each 30 foot grow bed.  Once the second grow bed t-posts are in place we will put another 8 foot long 4×4 on top to span the distance between each row. 

t-posts  for growing vertically in a Mittleider garden
t-posts for growing vertically in a Mittleider garden

UPDATE 20 May 2016 –

Just a couple pictures of more progress.  We need to tamp the posts in a little more as it dries out a little.  The support wires for both of the grow beds under this structure are up and tight.  One of the two grow beds is formed up and will be finished tomorrow.  Once done we’ve got another 18 tomatoes ready to go in the ground.

After this project is done we will continue to extend the grow beds to the right for a few other crops that are currently in seedling flats.  Just like in our grow box for sweet potatoes, there will be a 5 foot border around these grow beds to help control insects and weeds. 

vertical gardening in a Mittleider garden

Mittleider grow beds and support for vertical gardening

Growing tomatoes vertically in a Mittleider garden

The tomatoes are transplanted into our little Mittleider in garden green house. Recently we started the process of growing vertically to maximize the space and production of tomatoes. In the picture below you will see the heavy square baling twine we use to grow vertically.

 All the tomatoes are grown in one row with 9 inches of space between them. The twine is tied off at the bottom on a wire attached to our t-posts. The wire runs the length of the grow box and is 3 1/2″ above the grow box.  At the top of the t-posts are two more heavy gauge wires running the length of the grow beds.  We then alternate every other tomato plant and use a releasing knot to train the tomatoes to grow away from one another and maximize space. This ensure they get maximum air and sunlight.  In this picture below you can see the “V” pattern formed with the twine.  You’ll also notice extra twine hanging from the top. This allows me to lower the plant as we pick all the tomatoes from the bottom and the plant has grown all the way to that top wire.  And if you do your part they will grow that tall.

In the bottom picture you see where the twine is tied to the bottom heavy gauge wire.  If you tie the twine to the tomato plant you risk damaging it in two ways.  As the tomato grows the stem is going to get thicker.  If your twine is tied to it you risk the chance of strangling the tomato. Additionally, if you’re tied off at the plant you risk damaging or even pulling out the tomato if something or someone pulls on the twine. 

When wrapping  the twine It’s important to wrap the twine around the plant and not the plant around the twine. By doing the later you risk damaging your tomato plant.  Also, as you wrap towards the top take extra care not to damage or break off the growing rip, also known as the terminal bud.  Doing so I’ll stop the growth of your plant.   I stop sever inches short of the terminal bud to ensure that the twine doesn’t damage it. 

You can also grow other crops vertically such as crooked neck squash, eggplants, cucumbers and even melons.  We will have posts on growing the vertically in the future. 

growing tomatoes vertically with balng twine
using baling twine to grow tomatoes vertically

Growing tomatoes vertically in a Mittleider garden 

These tomatoes are being grown vertically as part of the Mittlieder Gardening Method in Kidder, MO.   They’re pruned and wound around heavy bailing twine to maximize the sunlight and air to the plants while making it easy to harvest.  No wire cages to fight here!   The 2×4 is just over 7 feet from the ground.  Some of those tomato plants are 10 feet tall.

This week I’ve been attending a Mittleider gardening course and have had the opportunity see the system implemented and learn so much.   I will have many more Mittleider posts in the future as I convert my traditional garden to a Mittlieder